Monday, June 27, 2016

Mid-Summer's Walk



Mid-Summer's Walk by Dana Stone

Whose woods these are
i think i know
the hills look steep and dense although
my hiking shoes and moxy strength
can guide me along the strenuous path

I moved here two years ago
and wanted to explore this path although
other plans kept getting in my way
so i decided to take the hike today

i boldly set to clear a path
i calculated long, did the math
took a step and then another
down to the murkey swamp

the woods are mine
they're behind my home
i decided to make them all my own
it's quiet there
a Dickinsian spot
a place to where i'll return 
tomorrow

Saturday, June 25, 2016

Standing Desk?

here's one, and cheap too!

https://techcrunch.com/2016/01/14/cardboard-standing-desk/



Another option from Wal Mart
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Brighton-High-Desk-with-2-Drawers/42755677

Thursday, June 23, 2016

20 Things to Remember for My Duke Interview

1.  Dress professionally and if it's not too hot, wear something navy.
2.  Make sure my bra straps aren't showing.
3.  Strike the Rocky pose and play the song.
4.  Memoize Emerson's "For Today" quote.
5.  Read more issues of Duke Magazine
6.  Check the oil in the car before leaving.
7.  Consider taking the bus.
8.  If driving, allow 30 min. to arrive.
9.  Bring along my sense of humor.
10. Elaborate on my passion for libraries, research, customer engagement, marketing, promotion, outreach, hospitality, Duke events.
11. Interview the interviewer.
12. Send a thank you note afterward.
13. Bring the resume
14. Bring the job description.
15. Have fun!
16.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Savion Glover

     I had the good fortune to attend a talk by dancer Savion Glover today at Nelson Auditorium.  He's appearing tonight at Duke's Page Auditorium.
     Savion is a good will ambassador for dance.  He started tap dancing at age 7 and his mentor was Gregory Hine.  Savion's latest accolate is the Broadway show, "Shuffle Along," which won him a Tony.
     This man is a student of tap dancing and is really serious about it.  In fact, he thinks of it as a high art form.  Some of the noteworthy musicians he has worked with are Arnett Coleman, Gregory Hines, McCoy Tyner, and Wayne Shorter.   Hines was his mentor.  
     His rhythmic talents began at the age of four and progressed to tap dancing.  At one point, he started to understand that thesse jazz musicians were sure about their craft."
     He described himself as having "an improvisational approach to life."  And as being late to everything because this helps to "raise the tension."
     He spoke about "tap dancing being a language."  And the language beneath that language.
     Marshall Davis, Jr. is a partner to Savion.  They grew up together so have developed a bond of trust and rapport over the years, even making the "same mistakes at the same time."
      Savion is his own person and has taken tap to a high form of art. The son of acclaimed actor, Danny Glover, I wonder if Glover refers to himself as father to Savion Glover.  Probably so.
       He has the utmost reverence for tap.  I need to learn about its history.  Are its roots in Africa, or the U. S.?
       Glover won a Tony for "Shuffle Along."  (Eubie Blake influence?)
      He calls dance "his life" and is grateful to God that he can share his talents.  He calls dance "the greatest means of expression."
       Marshall, his partner, proclaims that dancing is "not like work."
       After graciously sharing an hour of their time with the audience, the pair spent another 15 minutes answering questions and posing for photographs.

       After an interim in the library and having a picnic dinner, I headed over to Page for the concert, one of historical proportions.  Savior Glover has become the savior of tap.
   

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

The Kincanons of Tennessee and Virginia (letter to Mr. Gaynor, UVa Special Collections)

Dana L. Stone
802 E. Country Club Dr.
Tarboro, NC 27886
December 9, 2013



Dear Mr. Gaynor:
Thank you for your letter of October 23, 2013 regarding my gift of John Thomas Kincanon’s papers.  

I am enclosing a family history of Kincanon that was given to my mother and to other relatives in 1980 by Jimmie Kincanon, his grandson.  This will clarify the linkage between the Stones and the Kincanons. 
My grandmother, Birdie Kincanon Stone, was J. T’s daughter.  Her husband was my grandfather, Albert A. Stone, Sr., who helped to run the Stone Printing Company with his brother, Edward.  My father was Albert A. Stone, Jr. who at one time served as a vice-president of the Company.

 I’ve enclosed a copy of a photograph of J. T. Kincanon, along with a page from the Stone genealogy, “A Brief History of John Stone and Descendants,” compiled by Yvonne Slonaker of Roanoke.  I had always heard that J. T. Kincanon was a founder of Virginia Intermont College.   According to some research I found on the Internet, he was a Baptist minister who “held 27 pastorates.”

My father and all four of his brothers went to the University of Virginia:  Albert, Frederick, Charles, and Robert.   Currently, I am doing some research into my father’s World War I service.  He was with the Army Air Corps and trained as a pilot.  He left the University of Virginia in order to enlist in the war effort.
I thoroughly enjoyed my visit to the Library and was especially grateful to spend time reviewing the Books of Hours and many other items from the Stone archives.  I came across an issue of Stone’s Impressions, a Stone Printing Company publication which I understand my father edited.  The staff, especially Gail Cook, were extremely helpful in helping me with the research.

Please let me know if I can ever be of service.  I can be reached at 252-314-6849 or nceducator@gmail.com.With warm wishes,

Dana Stone
Enclosures (3)




"The Dress of One Occasion"

the poetry of A. E. Stallings knocks me out!

here is one of my favorites:

 The Dress of One Occasion 
The dress of one occasion in its box 
Belongs to yesterday and to tomorrow— 
But not to this day slowly turning yellow, 
For better or worse, among the cotton flocks.
 Disembodied now and ghostly pale, 
Mummified in tissue easily torn 
As though the flimsy pattern of a dress,
 It’s packed away—for what, you cannot guess— S
tored perhaps for someone not yet born 
(You cannot see the face behind the veil) T
he day of its occasion growing stale And brittle as a triangle of cake—
 Most innocent and decadent of frocks Because solemn and frivolous—
the fluff That blows away from dandelion clocks, 
The lace of time, that shifty, subtle stuff 
That only time itself knows how to make 
Out of the body’s loom, the velvet marrow. 
One Saturday in May, you thought the blue
 Above your heads was yours to keep and new, 
When really it was something old, to borrow. ... 

A. E. Stallings

Monday, June 13, 2016

The Glastonbury Thorn

     In 1977, I backpacked through Northern Europe and one of the most interesting places I visitied was Glastonbury, in England.  There, it is said that St. Joseph was on a pilgrimage to spread Christianity and he planted his staff in the ground.  Legend has it that the staff sprouted and became a tree, called the Glastonburg Thorn.  It could be seen from its home atop a hill all across town.

     Now I discover that the tree was chopped down several years ago.  What a shock, and terrible act of vandelism.  I wonder now what has been done.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1337159/Glastonburys-2000-year-old-Holy-Thorn-Tree-hacked-vandals.html



The Oldest Blooming Things

     My friend Bonnie Korta inspires me.  Every time we have lunch together she says the most interesting things!  Today she told me that "magnolias are the oldest blooming things."  What a thought!  (I'm not to crazy about magnolias).

     We also talked about Paul McCartney's song, "Blackbird."  He wrote it using a melody by Bach.  He and George Harrison played it together.  Funny, I forgot McCartney wrote this song.  I heard it playing by a classical guitarist as I was walking through the hospital lobby.  Listening to it totally took away my anxiety.

     The song has an interesting history.  Supposedly he wrote it about race relations...

      We talked about Billy Collins and how I gave him my pin of Pompey Ducklegs.  I really need to send Collins a copy of it...I hope he guarded my pin, and appreciates it, dammit.

      Finally, I told her the story of the Glastonbury Thorne...how the legend goes that Joseph of Arimathea planted his staff into the groud and it sprouted into the Glastonbury Thorne....

Sunday, June 12, 2016

Special Collections, and Archives, Oh My!

     June 12, 2016  

     I recently visited the Sally Bingham Women's Collection at Rubenstein Library. And there I met Laura Micham.  Such hospitality...meeting me at the gate, then explaining the history of the Sally Bingham Collection.  I was so impressed that I decided to donate my great-grandmother's diary to that library instead of UVa.  This way, I can be close to the diary in case I ever need to refer back to it.  Also, the book will be catalogued and preserved, and maybe even promoted (I hope).

     I learned a lot from Laura.  For example, her collection goes back to the 13th century and extends to the present.  It is also international in scope.  I'll be proud to have Emma's book in that collection.

     More about the book.  It's actually more of a memory book.

     Emma Cole Kincannon was married to J. T. Kincannon.  He helped to start the Bristol Female College (in Bristol, Tennessee at the time, I believe.)   I'd always been told that JT founded Virginia Intermont College in Bristol, Virginia.  My brother thought so to.  However, I haven't seen any documentation on that, so I'm not sure if there is any truth to it. I'm planning to contact the Bristol Public Library and the Bristol Historical Society for more information next week.

      From my research, I learned that the books called "Leaves of Affection"  were very popular in the 19th century.  Apparently, if someone was moving, that person's friends wrote poems in the book.  I am not sure if the poems were original, or copied from someone else.  There are no credits on the poems so I'm thinking that at least some of them were original.

     The most charming page in the book features a poem on the forget me not, alongside the actual flower, attached to a little ribbon.  I was so amazed that the book held together so well through the years, about 150, apparently.

   Laura Micham and I noted the elegant handwriting in the book.  It was tiny and very ornate.  This was because paper was in short supply (and perhaps expensive).

    "That's iron gall ink," Laura told me.  This kind of ink was used from the 5th century until well into the 20th century.  It was made from a mixture of iron salts and tannic acid.  Its appearance is purplish/brown and I find it quite lovely.

Here is link from Wikipedia about iron gall ink:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_gall_ink

   

Special Collections, and Archives, Oh My!

     June 12, 2016  

     I recently visited the Sally Bingham Women's Collection at Rubenstein Library. And there I met Laura Micham.  Such hospitality...meeting me at the gate, then explaining the history of the Sally Bingham Collection.  I was so impressed that I decided to donate my great-grandmother's diary to that library instead of UVa.  This way, I can be close to the diary in case I ever need to refer back to it.  Also, the book will be catalogued and preserved, and maybe even promoted (I hope).

     I learned a lot from Laura.  For example, her collection goes back to the 13th century and extends to the present.  It is also international in scope.  I'll be proud to have Emma's book in that collection.

     More about the book.  It's actually more of a memory book.

     Emma Cole Kincannon was married to J. T. Kincannon.  He helped to start the Bristol Female College (in Bristol, Tennessee at the time, I believe.)   I'd always been told that JT founded Virginia Intermont College in Bristol, Virginia.  My brother thought so to.  However, I haven't seen any documentation on that, so I'm not sure if there is any truth to it. I'm planning to contact the Bristol Public Library and the Bristol Historical Society for more information next week.

      From my research, I learned that the books called "Leaves of Affection"  were very popular in the 19th century.  Apparently, if someone was moving, that person's friends wrote poems in the book.  I am not sure if the poems were original, or copied from someone else.  There are no credits on the poems so I'm thinking that at least some of them were original.

     The most charming page in the book features a poem on the forget me not, alongside the actual flower, attached to a little ribbon.  I was so amazed that the book held together so well through the years, about 150, apparently.

   Laura Micham and I noted the elegant handwriting in the book.  It was tiny and very ornate.  This was because paper was in short supply (and perhaps expensive).

    "That's iron gall ink," Laura told me.  This kind of ink was used from the 5th century until well into the 20th century.  It was made from a mixture of iron salts and tannic acid.  Its appearance is purplish/brown and I find it quite lovely.

Here is link from Wikipedia about iron gall ink:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_gall_ink